Tuesday, April 8, 2014
I’m a frothingly huge Godzilla fan, but my old Big Stompy Monsters shirt is on its way to the rag bin. Since the new movie is coming soon, the Big Stompy Monsters shirt is back in the store for a few weeks only.

I’m a frothingly huge Godzilla fan, but my old Big Stompy Monsters shirt is on its way to the rag bin. Since the new movie is coming soon, the Big Stompy Monsters shirt is back in the store for a few weeks only.

Monday, March 3, 2014
The second Rachel Peng book, Maker Space, came out this morning! Readers of the series know that Rachel has a unique sense of vision; she can perceive emotions in color. This has turned out to be a “well it seemed like a good idea at the time!" aspect of her character, as emotions are pretty freakin’ confusing things and it is hard to depict them. 
For Rachel, emotions are part visual (color) and part physical (how they move). Emotions never occur one at a time—nobody is ever just happy, or just angry, or so on. If she is to make sense of emotions, she needs to identify the base color, which represents the person’s dominant mood, and then how the other colors interact with that color. For example, a person who is being sarcastic would likely be doubt-green, and this mood “drips”.
Here’s a passage from Maker Space that describes this phenomenon in more detail:

She and Santino had pitched battles over mixed emotions: how, for example, one person could be angry (Tuscan red, mixed with scarlet), horny (also red, but more of a crimson-carmine combination), and frustrated (red again, this time a rusty burgundy) simultaneously, and how the intensity and movement of these colors within a constantly changing surface layer revealed which emotions were driving the person at any given time.

It is also hard to depict them accurately over an entire novel, let alone a series. This is my reference sheet for most—not all!—of the major emotions used throughout the stories. I keep a Word document open at all times to jot down each new one that I use, but I’m not drawing all of those up or I will go completely starkers.
Hope you enjoyed this little cheat sheet for some of Rachel’s abilities.

The second Rachel Peng book, Maker Space, came out this morning! Readers of the series know that Rachel has a unique sense of vision; she can perceive emotions in color. This has turned out to be a “well it seemed like a good idea at the time!" aspect of her character, as emotions are pretty freakin’ confusing things and it is hard to depict them. 

For Rachel, emotions are part visual (color) and part physical (how they move). Emotions never occur one at a time—nobody is ever just happy, or just angry, or so on. If she is to make sense of emotions, she needs to identify the base color, which represents the person’s dominant mood, and then how the other colors interact with that color. For example, a person who is being sarcastic would likely be doubt-green, and this mood “drips”.

Here’s a passage from Maker Space that describes this phenomenon in more detail:

She and Santino had pitched battles over mixed emotions: how, for example, one person could be angry (Tuscan red, mixed with scarlet), horny (also red, but more of a crimson-carmine combination), and frustrated (red again, this time a rusty burgundy) simultaneously, and how the intensity and movement of these colors within a constantly changing surface layer revealed which emotions were driving the person at any given time.

It is also hard to depict them accurately over an entire novel, let alone a series. This is my reference sheet for most—not all!—of the major emotions used throughout the stories. I keep a Word document open at all times to jot down each new one that I use, but I’m not drawing all of those up or I will go completely starkers.

Hope you enjoyed this little cheat sheet for some of Rachel’s abilities.

Friday, December 27, 2013
Christmas filler for 2013. I was so, so proud of my readers who emailed me to say, “But… That toy… But… Isn’t that one of Speedy’s… EW.”

Christmas filler for 2013. I was so, so proud of my readers who emailed me to say, “But… That toy… But… Isn’t that one of Speedy’s… EW.”

Thursday, October 31, 2013
Halloween filler!  I did the ladies last year, so this year is sexy Josh. This may be the first time he has been called a Time Lord.
(Really do not like his pose. Had Brown model in big coats and everything, and it still looks icky.)

Halloween filler!  I did the ladies last year, so this year is sexy Josh. This may be the first time he has been called a Time Lord.

(Really do not like his pose. Had Brown model in big coats and everything, and it still looks icky.)

Tuesday, October 8, 2013 Friday, October 4, 2013 Wednesday, October 2, 2013
Okay okay okay, Let me ‘splain… No, there is too much, let me sum up.
Someone called John Scalzi a mangina, and Seanan McGuire said  “‘Mangina’ doesn’t sound like an insult, it sounds like a kaiju” and then things got wildly out of control.

Okay okay okay, Let me ‘splain… No, there is too much, let me sum up.

Someone called John Scalzi a mangina, and Seanan McGuire said  “‘Mangina’ doesn’t sound like an insult, it sounds like a kaiju” and then things got wildly out of control.

Thursday, August 29, 2013
Made a Futurama template for today’s comic, and used it to make a bonus Frederick Douglass head-in-a-jar.  Modeled after this image: the man was fierce.

Made a Futurama template for today’s comic, and used it to make a bonus Frederick Douglass head-in-a-jar.  Modeled after this image: the man was fierce.

Thursday, July 25, 2013
A reader just sent me the new “South-east Queensland Koala Plan” for managing the koala populations in Queensland, Australia.  We have decided this is not a hilarious typo, but was written by a wildlife official who thinks Speedy’s Australian offspring are cute.
The fool.

A reader just sent me the new “South-east Queensland Koala Plan” for managing the koala populations in Queensland, Australia.  We have decided this is not a hilarious typo, but was written by a wildlife official who thinks Speedy’s Australian offspring are cute.

The fool.

Thursday, July 4, 2013